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leak in history. prosecutors made their closing arguments on thursday and the defense followed on friday. he is the first-ever defendant to face and aiding the enemy charge for leaking more than 700,000 documents to wikileaks and other news agencies, and could case -- said a major precedent. the judge in the case is now deliberating over the 21 charges manning faces and has not said when she will rule. many of manning's supporters are dismissal of a possible guilty finding and to reduce the whistleblower sentence. on friday, whistleblowers block the gates of fort mcnair in washington, where offices are located. is not whether or not he was naive. >> the idea that he is being punished for coming out against war crimes and cruelty by his fellow servicemen is really disturbing. >> over the weekend, protesters around the world also held rallies to mark in international day of action calling for manning's release. for more, we are joined from fort meade, via video stream, with alexa o'brien. she is in her car outside the courtroom. she was the first to make transcripts of the procee
service. that's a tough charge. what's armstrong's defense? >> lance armstrong now says the postal service should have known he was doping. >> he's saying, "i lied. you should have known that i lied." >> john: wow. that's his defense? this guy has got a lot of ball. [ cheers and applause ] he's pleading so guilty it's your fault for not knowing how guilty he is. is he arguing any mitigating circumstances? >> i know it was an unfortunate period in our sport. unfortunately for me, i came, you know, right smack dab in the middle of that period. >> john: you know what? he's right. that is the real tragedy here. i think we all owe lance armstrong an apology for making him win seven tour de frances earning millions of dollars in the process during such an unfortunate period in the sport he chose to participate in. all right. on the basis of this world record narcissism i find the defendant a giant douche. jason. [ cheers and applause ] jason, please call our final defendant. >> sure will, judge johnny. the court calls joseph r. biden,, jr., the delaware destroyer, he's got a lion's heart, a sail
in his own defense. his attorneys have stayed tight-lipped so far but there is speculation that bulger will want to testify. he's facing a slew of charges, including 19 counts of murder. if he's found guilty of even some at age 83, he'll likely spend the rest of his life in prison. robert fitzpatrick wrote a book about trying to stop bulger. this case has been full of fireworks. deborah feyerick has been live. bring us up to date on this case. >> his lawyers have asked that the jury be sequestered during deliberations. prosecutors are against it and the judge is going to have to decide that. it's still not clear whether bulger is going to testify. they are going to testify over the period of two witnesses. key among them, a mother whose daughter was killed by bulger and her ex-boyfriend. she's going to be called to testify that her daughter was being sexually molested by the man and therefore he had a greater motive to kill her. also on this list of witnesses is a crime associate who is likely to take the fifth. the reason is that he was actually implicated in one of the murders. now,
of the big activities was the defense spending bill. what is the headlines coming out of that discussion? guest: the headline has to do with the national security agency. it was a very close vote. it shows how divided the house -200epresentatives, 217 five, to keep allowing the nsa to collect telephone records. host: explain it to those that are not following it closely. many: i don't imagine too people do not understand it. this is the national security agency that was found to be collecting phone calls. they are randomly collecting phone calls under court orders from a secret court. certainly a lot of people do not want to be listened to. this was all covered by edward snowden, now sitting in the moscow airport. to stop a vote to try this practice, which was authorized by congress as part of the patriot act after 9/11. host: the amendment did not survive? guest: it did not survive. it does not explain how that would happen. host: who supported this amendment and who opposed it? we saw a lot of things that you probably did not see before. we have liberal democrats who did not like the g
, the government, says yes. the defense says look at things like that video. it's all about embarrassing the government. manning was disillusioned with the war, he was troubled by what he saw like the matter in that video, and he wanted the public to know what was going on. that's the defense's case. the prosecution sees it very differently. >> is manning really looking at 136 years in prison, or in the end, could it really be a much shorter time? >> reporter: well, that would be the maximum. you know, there is an interesting wrinkle in that question, because the judge has already said she will knock off about 112 days off any sentence he gets because of the time he served at a military prison here in the washington area in which he was held in solitary confinement, stripped naked. the government again said that was because he was a suicide risk. the judge found suicide risk or not, that was not the correct or appropriate condition for him to be held in, so she's already going to take time off for that. i think the issue is the government will go for the maximum, and the defense will hav
. the clerk: a bill making appropriations for the department of defense for the fiscal year ending september 30, 2014, and for other purposes. the chair: when the committee of the whole rose on tuesday, july 23, 2013, amendment number 66 printed in house report 113- 170 offered by the gentlewoman from hawaii, ms. hanabusa, had been disposed of. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 12, proceedings will now resume on amendments printed in house report 113-170 on which further proceedings were postponed in the following order. amendment number 48 by mr. jones of north carolina. amendment number 51 by mr. lamalfa of california. amendment number 55 by mr. mulvaney of south carolina. amendment number 60 by mr. stockton of texas. amendment number 62 by mrs. walorski of indiana. amendment number 65 by ms. bonamici of oregon. the chair will reduce to two minutes the time for each electronic vote in this series. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 48 printed in house report 113-170 offered by mr. the gentleman from north carolina, mr. jones, on which further proceedi
. >>> today's producer pick could be a tv ad for a self-defense class, a thief messes with the wrong woman. a thief in russia thought he picked an easy target when he tried to grab a woman's cell phone. wait until you see how she fought back. she fought back leaving him flopping on the floor and then she walked away with her phone and all of her stuff. you can check out more by heading to thomas roberts facebook page. crime does not pay. >>> breaking news unfolding in new jersey. a small united express flight just made an emergency landing at newark international airport in new jersey due to smoke somewhere in the plane. there's currently a groundstop at the airport. it's not clear at this point how many people are on board. we'll bring you updates as we get them. turning to florida now the not guilty verdict in the george zimmerman trial is putting a new spotlight on the case of a woman sentenced to 20 years in prison for firing a warning shot into the air. for more than one year marisa alexander has been sitting in prison after a jury found her guilty of aggravated assault. she used the
" tonight, both the prosecution and the defense have made closing arguments. now the soldier's fate is in the hands of a judge. we get an update. >> woodruff: then, houston-based halliburton admitted to destroying evidence after the 2010 gulf oil spill. hari sreenivasan looks at the implications for the energy services company and oil giant b.p. >> brown: protesters took to the streets in two north african countries today. margaret warner fills us in on the latest in egypt, with conspiracy charges against the former president and in tunisia, after another political assassination. >> woodruff: the fukushima nuclear plant-- crippled by an earthquake and tsunami two years ago-- is leaking contaminated water into the sea. we get a rare glimpse inside the still radioactive area. >> the regalia in which i'm now standing including this, a dose meter, which will give my accumulated radiation dose across the time were inside the exclusion zone. >> brown: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the
. they took shelter overnight at a nearby facility. self-defense force personnel picked them up in helicopters on monday morning. >> translator: i'm relieved. >> translator: i'm all right. i want to tell my family that i'm okay. >> reporter: floods also stranded the facility for the elderly in hagi with nearly 80 people inside. >> translator: i was in the corridor facing the river. the river was swelling and it seemed it was higher than me. i was nervous. >> translator: the water broke the windows and came gushing in. i feared for my life. >> reporter: the staff closed the fire doors. the water continued to flood in. so they gave up trying to stop it. >> translator: we opened the doors so that the water could pass. we took refuge at a place where the water wasn't a danger. panic was last thing we wanted, so we kept telling each other, it's going to be all right. it's going to be all right. >> reporter: the residents gathered in a hall but water kept flowing in. the residents were asked to get on top of the beds that had been brought in, to wait for the water to subside. >> translator: i feared
of defense and the secretaries of all of the armed forces groups, got together to honor the veterans of the korean war. it was a sight to see so many korean veterans from so many different parts of the country. and they were reminded by our president that we had been labeled as those who participated in what was referred to as the forgotten war. because most all of the world knew about the importance of america being involved in saving emocracy in world war ii and vietnam. good or bad, people knew people that went there. but somehow in the middle of that, no one really missed us or knew where korea was or didn't appear that there was too much concern. d when we did return, unlike the vietnam veterans who really unfairly had been treated so unkind, fortunately for us, we were never missed except by our family and friends, people never they here we were and to us. weren't as kind veterans turned out from all over. comrades that were part of the 20 countries that were part of the united nations. and when north koreans invaded south korea, those of us who were called to go to south korea
, a black man who used self defense to kill at the time a 16-year-old white kid he said was charging him, hadn't been hit, but shot him in self defense, and he was acquitted, the black man. what about that one? it is the same exact thing. opposite of trayvon martin. >> they're not following that case, that's the difference. >> so the president follows the press? >> i think it is fair to say every white house in one way or another follows the news cyclee concept. i hope not. >> well, it is a little difficult to get out from underneath the news cycle in an overwhelming story. dana i think would agree, it is difficult to see if -- >> i think to talk about it later, but the initial comment -- >> hold on. what i am saying is the president chose that trayvon martin case to get involved in. the press wasn't implicating the white house or tying it to the white house, calling the white house racist by any means. he is the one brought himself in it. >> i don't think there's a black man in america that doesn't feel the frustration of being tagged and i think he wanted to say it. wanted to try to ex
experience, and largely saw the confrontation through his eyes and the way the defense portrayed it. but she couldn't identify with trayvon martin's female friend who what haitian-american. so that term creepy-ass cracka that rachel jeantel said trayvon used, you're saying that's simply how they talked to each other? >> sure. that's the way they talk. >> and did you see that as a negative statement or a racial statement as the defense suggested? >> i don't think it's really racial. i think it's just everyday life, the type of life that they live and how they're living and the environment that they're living in. >> so you didn't find her credible as a witness? >> no. >> so juror b-37 was part of a six-member panel. all female, one african-american. one of our guests said the trial was over when the jury was seated. do you think that's a fair statement? and more broadly, is racial bias built into the system? let's talk about it with sunny hostin, jeffrey toobin, jose baez, julie blackman is a jury consultant in the martha stewart case. robert horshorn, jury consultant and defense attorney mark
glimpse of its military, taking media on tour of its bases. the defense ministry showing off some of china's latest and most sophisticated anti-aircraft and anti-ship weapons. >>> and pope francis opening up a news conference on his flight back to rome from brazil. the pontiff saying he enjoyed his first be overseas trip saying he especially liked the minimal security, that was a little wit controversial. he traveled amongst the crowds without bulletproof glass or armored cars, and he liked it. he also hinted his next trip may be to asia. jon: now this fox news weather alert. hawaii is bracing for heavy rains and strong winds from tropical storm frost si. the storm weakened over the past few hours, but sustained winds of up to 60 miles an hour are expected today. meteorologists warn flash flooding, tornadoes and mud slides also possible. hawaii's governor already declaring a state of perjury there. residents are hard at work getting ready stocking up at basics at grocery stores and other places. of others, including boat owners, are trying to make sure everything is tied down. some have de
. >> laura: joining us now from w. reaction two criminal defense attorneys from new york stacy snyder and from davey, florida, regina tombinascus. it's great to see both of you. that got everybody talking yesterday that's for sure this juror speaking out. regina, let's talk with you. we heard from that other juror b-37 who she thought both men could have stepped back. that both were responsible but that she believed that zimmerman had a right to defend himself. now this juror comes forward and says zimmerman got away with, quote: murder, but then goes on to say we reached the right verdict. can you say get away with murder and reached the right verdict? >> yes, you can actually, because there is no question that trayvon was killed by george zimmerman. the issue was whether or not it was self-defense or not. and these jurors had that question posed to them. they had the law. fanned they thought there was nord reasonable doubt there this was murder they should have spoken up in the jury room. not weeks later after media attacks their. system we agree to live by. >> laura: i don't like t
>> shepard: the news begins anew. the defense it set to make the case for "whitey" bulger, charged with 19 brutal murders. the trial has already seen explosive testimony. screaming matches. lots of f bombs, and now there's a chance that "whitey" bulger himself may take the stand. also, we're hearing soon we'll get a verdict in the biggest leak of classified information this country has ever seen. a controversial case that could put army private bradley manning in prison for the rest of his life. we'll break down with the judge, judge andrew napolitano, but a whole water park is shut down now an young swimmer caught a deadly parasite, one that eats away your brain. we'll talk to a doctor about what families need to know on how to prevent it. that's all ahead, unless breaking news changes everything. on "studio b." >> shepard: fir from fox at 3:00 in new york city. the mob trial of "whitey" bulger, and the case moves to the defense now. lawyers for the accused mob boss said, yes, he ran a criminal enterprise for decades. still they say he did not take part in any of the 19 murders wi
working with the prosecution and stonewalling the defense. this is really just a whitewash and it's disappointing, and frankly, makes me furious. filedon's attorneys have a motion saying that they were denied exculpatory evidence. student new lost his life after being handcuffed in a cell for four days without food or water. daniel john had been arrested at a celebration for marijuana culture. he was due to be released, but the dea and his agents forgot about him after placing him in a holding cell. he said he could see -- here's staffers outside of his cell, but no one answered his pleas for help. he drank his own urine in a bid to survive. none of the agents involved will face charges. six activists with a group codepink were arrested inside the senate are building on tuesday for protests calling for the closure of guantanamo bay. three demonstrators are on their long-term hunger strike in solidarity with guantanamo prisoners. those are some of the headlines. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. welcome to our listeners and viewers around the count
killer but also a pedophile. the former prosecutor, criminal defense attorney and some real characters that we're all being introduced to in this trial. dan, you first. i'm wondering about the testimony from the so-called rifleman. how damaging is that do you think to the defense? >> in terms of the actual charges that whitey bulger is facing, it's not that damaging. murder charges are going to be proved. there's overwhelming evidence. however, this case is unusual. it seems like the defense is more focused on stopping the prosecution from proving things that ruin his reputation like he's a rat or kills women or he's a pedophile and in that sense, that means a lot to the defense. in terms of whether he'll be convicted of murder, it probably won't make a difference. rick: what do you think of that point, the defense strategy here? could this be some kind of a preventative strategy before this guy goes to prison? >> definitely. i think they've had the conversation and bulger has told his attorneys, look. i'm going down. i know i'm going to prison but i at least need to be protected. i ca
, let me get to you react to what mark o'mara, the defense attorney for george zimmerman posted a little while ago, while juror b-29 is a model juror. "people may disagree with self-defense laws but a juror's job is not to decide what a law should be, her job is to apply the facts presented at trial to the laws they are instructed about. this is the eence of what we seek in a juror, the at to use one as common sense, apply the law to the facts, agree not to be swayed by sympathy or emotion, no matter how loudly it's argued by the prosecutors and decide a lawful and fair verdict." do you agree that juror b-29 was a, quote, model juror? >> well, i don't know if she was a model juror or not. i certainly think that she approached the process in good faith. i don't think there's any reason to doubt that she did that. but i think jeffrey makes a good point. what is really clear when we hear this juror speak is that she really misunderstood the law. she did not appropriately apply the law to the facts because she didn't understand it. and the reason why she didn't understand it could be because
their job? >> well, i initially felt that this was probably going to be a defense case because the prosecution just didn't have the evidence. but anybody who watched this network during the trial knows that as time went on, i began to see evidence that the prosecution, they simply weren't arguing and by closing argument they failed to put it together. it's entirely predictable this jury would take the jury instructions the law and try to apply the facts and if they don't fit they have to acquit and what jurors do in every case. >> were you surprised by what she was saying? >> no. this is exactly what i was saying frankly before the verdict this is how it was going to turn out when both sides are arguing reasonable doubt only one possible outcome and that was acquittal. she couldn't put it together. that is the prosecution' job. give them the theory of the case. that didn't happen. they failed to do that and so this was the predictable outcome and i'm so moved by her -- her tension, her conflict that she somehow knows this wasn't the right outcome but it's the one she had to com
who is now a senior fellow at the foundation for the defense of democracy. you have these mass rallies across egypt. do you think that the army got the mandate that they wanted when they called for this day of action? >> i suspect that the general would be satisfied with almost any demonstration that came out on his behalf. i think it is clear that they want to crack down on the brotherhood. they need as much popular support as they can get for that and for good cause. i think that this represents still the majority of the population. the military is probably backed by a minority of the population. >> isn't this a risky strategy when the country seems so divided? >> and the generals view, it is is the only strategy they have. they're looking to keep them in a state of herman and contests. they are trying to intimidate the brotherhood. >> what do you make of these charges, that he conspired with hamas. i think they are trumped up. have known about this for quite some time. they could have used to disqualify him from running from the presidency. a really means for them to try to intimida
of the defense budget. taiwan's defense minster has resigned. they stepped down after a public outcry after the death of a young soldier. he died of heat stroke at the beginning of this month. officers had forced him to exercise vigorously and deny him water. they were punishing him for bringing a mobile phone with a camera on to a base. investigators found that ia surveillance video may have been tampered with. the leaders plan to stop in 2015 and want to switch to voluntary enlistments and hope to create units of italy troops. # >> residents of concern japan are picking up the pieces. torrential rains slashed the region leaving one dead and two missing. we have a report. >> this is how the downpours left the city in the prefecture. the force of floodwaters left houses leaning and covered in mud. this is completely filled with sludge. they are covered with mud and rocks. they are strewn with lumber and other debro. mudslides block train tracks and rescuers are searching for the missing and the efforts are being hampered by the risk of landslides. a month's worth of rain fell in a half day
with not overseeing people and his defense is he is not overseeing people. >> you hit it on the head in her words you're trying to work both sides of the room. wait a minute, are you a brilliant genius one of the greatest traders of all time or so bumbling you're not reading e-mails. having said that ceo number one play to say i didn't see that, i didn't read that. because it deflates knowily. your point is such a good one. melissa: steve wha is your take on this? because, it is believable,f you get thousands of e-mai he didn't look at every single one. i don't know. >> yeah. that seems like a reasonable defense. i hate these charges anyway. i think insider trading is a extremely difficult thing to prove. and i think that, by the way, if i were king there wouldn't be insider trading laws. i don't think insider trading should be illegal, getting information ahead of somebody else. but you know, steve cen is no angel here. theris no question this company has been under investigation for a long time for shady dealing but i'm not so sure that this defense might not stick up. that he simply didn't know wh
middle class. no good for our national defense. we ought to be having a debate about the kinds of medium and long term reforms to entitlements and tax program, but we ought not to be calling about holding the country hostage to a fights over extending the debt limit. >> here now brad sherman democrat from california and steve so h steve solice republican. get rid of the see questions terks raise taxes and spend more money. i'm here to tell you it's not going to happen. >> well, i don't think a lot of things being talked at by either party are likely to happen. you won't see a defunding of obamacare. you're unlikely to see the republicans agree to any revenue nths.ases in the next few what i hope we don't see is a default on the debt and those people who are talking about deliberately defaulting on the american debt are in the words of mccain giving us shenanigans that the american people have gotten tired up. >> steve, are you in the camp that basically condition want to fund any part of obamacare and would risk a government shutdown or some kind of default on the debt, are you in that c
by political asylum. there is a complete defense for whistle blowers to criminality. think about it. the people who expose the milan massac massacre, should they have been prosecuted. auschwitz, should that person have been prosecuted? >> david, i'd love to get your thoughts on this. the debate over whether or not lives have been harmed is still very a raging debate. a lot of people would argue the other side of that. >> one thing that bradley manning did was he didn't leak documents on a given one of these things, you know, that michael just went through was a major dump that had what some people depending where they sit, good leaks and bad leaks. to me, it's very troubling that he would be prosecuted under the espionage act even though he was let off on the aiding and abetting the enemy, which i thought was ridiculous, is this really espionage. if you look at the washington post, they have a great chart this morning, 20 odd different counts. michael i'm sure is familiar with all of them. only a few espionage. there were others about leaking classified information, violating regulations, thing
defense of the united states and think of those channels. think of those challenges that they met. are we so small that we can only look at our facebook likes today in this chamber? or are we going to stand up and find out how many lives we can save. let us get back to the big politics of protecting america and moving america forward. soundly reject this amendment, let's do this right on the authorization bill. the chair: the gentleman's time has expire. the gentleman from florida reserves. mr. young: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman from ichigan is recognized. mr. amash: i yield two minute -- one minute to the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. conyers: ladies and gentlemen of the house, this amendment will not stop the proper use of the patriot act and fisa authorities to conduct terrorism and intelligence investigations. i've never block -- i'd never block that. all this amendment is intended ongoing to curtail the dragnet collection and storage of the personal records of innocent americans. it does not defund the n.s.a.
me now, criminal defense attorney page pate and columnist for "chicago defender" welcome back. jason, let's start with the emotion of this case. what that juror just said that she carries this on her back and she will carry this in her forever. >> this is huge and interesting that she is the only juror that wants to come forward and be seen because there is a classic example. a difference between the law and justice. she reflects with a lot of people out there protesting over the last two and a half weeks we're talking about. everybody knows this guy did something wrong, but whether we can fit that into the law, that's the challenge. >> page, like juror b37 she seemed to be confused by the law. maddie said, "that's where i felt confused. if a person kills someone, you get charged for it. as the law was read to me, if you have no proof he killed him intentionally, you can't say he's guilty. did she get that right? >> she did get that right but she started out as a guilty, a guilty on the more serious murder charge. what happened back in the jury room is you had other jurors who had li
. the secretary of defense does not seem like he is too torn up over drastic cuts to our nation's military budget. general jackies joins us to assess the impact. lou: in lou: in breaking news tonight, to new developments in the house of representatives. moments ago lawmakers passed the senate approved a plan to lower loan interest rates for college students nationwide. the house voted 392-31 on a bill that sets interest rates on the ten year treasury note plus a cap. that bill now headed to the white house where the president has already said he will sign into law. the house of representatives also approving new tougher sanctions against iran. that vote 400-20. defense secretary jack hegel today says he is not as he put it crying wolf about sequester cuts. he laid out how the pentagon planning for what could be the smallest army since before world war ii will look like. >> if these abrupt cuts remain we risk fielding a force that over the next two years is unprepared to to a lack of training, may nice, and the latest equipment. cuts on this scale would in effect be a decade-long modernization hol
, and he acts in self-defense, that's incredible bad luck he found himself in that situation twice. but we'll sleep soundly. >> you would sleep soundly if you did it again? >> if he's acting legally in self-defense again, absolutely. >> and at what point does he have to take responsibility for pursuing, some would sigh stalking unarmed teenagers who are walking home? >> again, two different levels of government review have found no fault with mr. zimmerman's actions. >> i'm asking you if you do. if you think at any point he has any responsibility for his own actions? in other words, if you're going to arm this guy again, give him a gun that he's recently used to shoot an unarmed teenager. if you're going to arm him again, and that's what you've actively done. you've raised $12,000 to arm him with guns, ammunitions, security and so on, that's fine. what if he does it again? >> well, i mean, we can go through all the hypotheticals you'd like to go through, what it comes down to is that he's gone through a government review again in the second hypothetical situation that you're raising, then
and today on "studio b," a former military prosecutor, who is now a defense attorney, told me the government has not convicted somebody of aiding the enemy since 1917. >> that was is essentially a case where somebody was disclosing information because they wanted americans to be killed. they wanted the enemy to have this information. and, in this case, i think the government just was not able to prove that pfc manning intentionally disclosed this to the enemy. >> shepard: manning supporters demonstrated outside othe courthouse today they see him as the whistle blower, a hero, not a criminal. so do lawyers who just called him naive with good intentions. manning admits he did give wikileaks more than 700,000 documents. prosecutors claim he knew al qaeda would see that information on that, prosecutors for the government lost completely. catherine herridge is on fox top story in the courthouse in fort mead in maryland. what happened in the courtroom today, catherine. >> late today the a.p. picked up comments from the defense indicating that they really felt today's verdict was a significant win
of top secret files. his defense says that is not true. >> an amazing surveillance video shows at moment a passenger train jumped the tracks. see the video and hear from witnesses all ahead unless breaking news changes everything on studio "b." >> anthony weiner admits that he sent racy messages to more women. as many as three women in total after he quit congress, if have a he apologized and said it was all behind him and after the big spread on the cover of a magazine talking about his wonderful family and an occasion while his wife was pregnant. but the guy who apparently calls himself carlos danger online he wants voters in the big city for mayor. he will not drop out. race. it's all happening the same did a day that the gossip website the dirty published about a it called extreme uncensored images from his graphic text. and they are. don't go there. just don't. the "new york daily news" reports one of the three women is named sidney leathers, she is now 23 years old. they describe her as heavily tattooed high school dropout from southern indiana hell bent becoming famous, that is a
250 sport sedan. geico's defensive driver,ke 13. good student and multi-policy discounts could save you hundreds of dollus. engineer: uh geico's discounts could save you hundreds of "doll-ars." it sounds like you're saying "dollus." dollus. engineeif you could accentuate the "r" sound of "dollars." are...are... are... engineer: are... arrrrrr. arrrrr. someone bring me an eye patch, i feel like a bloomin' pirate. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. honestly, i feel like i nailed that. ♪ >> stuart: aside from phony, another word getting a lot attention from the president. >> growing inequality. >> we have tolerated a little more inequality. >> inequality will continue to increase. >> stuart: you heard it. president obama using inequality more than the word growth at the illinois speech. to charles payne that is a problem. >> it is a serious problem. instead of talking about growing inequality, a result of opportunity, he talked about it being morally wrong. if you and i came into this building and there were different sets of rules, tha
teams, prime minister, secretary of state, minister of defense, chief financial officer, united nations body with a few students, world bank body and arms dealers. put that into the other questionable side about human nature and eagerly play the role. and random stock market and random -- random events to determine the severity of emergencies or good fortune. we also have a center, this is not always but sometimes in the office that student is my best student, i want to use that student's skill sets so i asked that student would you use your ability to get in trouble so much and cause so much disruption to the good of the game and other students and they jump at the chance so that student has to have a two infold job. they are playing their role in the world peace game, trying to win the game, there are two objectives to solve the crises and raise asset values beyond the starting point, trying to do that, senator confusion agent and at the same time through this information, ambiguities, irrelevancies, misleading, they cannot lie out right, they are trying to destroy the entire game so
a travesty. >> mid win, if you are the defense, what do you do to separate this son from this father? >> what i would do is focus on the son and build him up as a person, and get the jury to understand what kind of person this man is. he's a young person, and i think jury oftentimes feel several thinkic for a defendant who is really, really young. i found that tape to be shocking, saying he doesn't understand why people are so persistent that this is a murder. i think it's the best way to try this case. >> it was chilling to hear the father talk about that like that. joshua young is 17 years old right now. he was 15 when the murder was committed. his appearance, he does seem so incredibly young. that is what the jury will be looking at. a very young man, but how much of the father will they see in the trial? how much of that other image, heather, is likely to get into their heads? >> that's what the prosecution is going to have to do. plaintiffs a suppression hearing to keep out of the some of the statements of josh young. it would be interesting if he admitted to some participation, it will
: we are just hours away from a sentencing hearing, on wednesday morning, where defense and prosecutors will argue of over what is an appropriate sentence. the judge could decide to let the charges run concurrently or string them out, and come up with a number of years that manning will serve. erin? >> that number of years so important. thank you very much, chris. >>> republican congressman peter king, a member of the house homeland security committee and the house intelligence committee. good to see you, sir, as always. >> thank you. >> are you happy, dispointed? what word would you use? >> i'm gratified that he was convicted on five counts of espionage, plus the other theft counts. this is a serious, serious crime. and five counts, that should have a very, very significant prison sentence and hopefully it will be deterrent to other people such as bradley manning or edward snowden, that type of individual that blooechls they can disclose national secrets. >> so, the essentisentencinsent this court-martial is going to start tomorrow. he could get up to 136 years. what is the appropriate
is. that's what the defense did. that's why what the defense did was so masterful. that's why this prosecution, frankly, was abismil. >> mark was half right, better than his average. the prosecution did make a mistake -- >> just remember, jeff, you were 100% wrong all the way during this trial. so i'll give you -- >> that's not true, anyway. >> that's true, you were better than sunny was. >> thanks, thank, mark. >> the prosecution did make a big mistake in closing about not addressing the jury instructions in a more direct way, however, the fact is the evidence matters, and there was not a lot of evidence here where the prosecution could point to saying that george zimmerman committed this crime. >> i want to bring ben crump into this conversation, and benjamin, you spoke about how frustrating it's been to hear from two jurors now, who have both said basically they were confused by the jury instructions. let me play a little bit more from the juror on that. listen to this. >> i was the juror that was going to give them the hung jury. i was. i fought until the end. >> do you ha
, will the accused mob boss, whitey bulger, take the stand in his own defense? he is accused of playing a part in 19 murders. while running a notorious boston gang. and, later, becoming one of the nation's most high fro file fugitives. tonight, a look at the strategy for defending whitey bulger. a bus packed with teenagers was headed back from church camp, just a mile from home when this happened. >> came from my left. hit the concrete median and flipped. >> shepard: a pastor and killed. tonight, remembering the dead, comforting the survivors and trying to figure out what caused this crash. plus, he reportedly stole more than $100 million in diamond jewelry. and he did it in a room full of people without firing a single shot. tonight, the masked man who made off with a fortune. but, first from fox this monday night, defending a notorious mobster accused of murder, over and over again. lawyers for whitey bulger began calling witnesses today and now we're waiting to hear whether whitey bulger himself will testify in his own defense. the charges against him, as i mentioned, include 19 murders. murders
he disclosed, and computer fraud. defense attorney davis comes hailed the acquittal on aiding the enemy saying "today is a good day, but bradley is by no means out of the fire. his supporters have argued manning is a whistle-blower who exposed official malfeasance for the public good. >> engage, roger! >> reporter: among the most incendiary of his disclosure, a 2007 video that wikileaks called "collateral murder." it showed the crew of a u.s. helicopter gunship in iraq as mate sheen gunned a group of men suspected of being iraqi insurgents. instead, those killed included a reuters news service cameraman and his driver. the 25-year-old manning had already pleaded guilty to several lesser charges. the sentencing phase on today's convictions begins tomorrow and the penalty could add up to 136 years in prison. and we'll have more on the manning verdict after the other news. >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, a new definition of cancer. senator gillibrand on curbing sexual assaults in the military; drug gangs turn honduras into the murder capital of the world; and life and de
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